Spoon – Can I Sit Next To You

Wolfman rides the subway.

He’s come a long way from his days in the forest. He’s civilized. Red Riding Hood is willing to date him. Life is good… until the polkadot druids come calling. Can he dance his way out their grasp?

No need, it seems; they eventually vanish like Obi Wan getting lightsabered. By the way, how did his robe stay behind when the rest of his clothing went with him? And how did he get a new robe when he came back as a ghost?

This freakish mélange is from Spoon’s upcoming Hot Thoughts.

-Scott Bryson

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The Lemon Twigs – “I Wanna Prove to You”

Are those actors, or could they actually be the world’s coolest, most cooperative grandparents?

An on-demand make-out session? A group nap? A snowball fight? A baptism? It’s not surprising the dudes in The Lemon Twigs were looking to get themselves adopted.

“I Wanna Prove to You” comes from the duo’s debut, Do Hollywood.

-Scott Bryson

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Blve Hills – “Come On In”

Dude just wanted to grab the morning paper and have a smoke in peace, but there can be no leisure amidst litter.

Of course, such an invasion could never go unpunished, though it appears the two rivals made up and formed a friendship more quickly than most enemies. They do have a number of common interests: smoking; riding scooters; teasing cats. It’s a good thing neither of them is hiding a sinister secret…

“Come On In” is taken from Blve Hills’ upcoming EP (March).

-Scott Bryson

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Austra – “I Love You More Than You Love Yourself”

Now this is an efficient shopper—must be that “NAZA” training.

It looks like she may be buying supplies for a murder, though. If you’re going to shop for this kind of stuff, maybe wear something less conspicuous. At least she’s thinking far enough ahead to buy an on-the-lam wig.

“I Love You More Than You Love Yourself” comes from Austra’s just-out Future Politics.

-Scott Bryson

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Goodbye Honolulu – “Mother To A Brother”

At the Goodbye Honolulu band meeting:

“We should make a video.”
“Will we be in the video?”
“Yes, dressed like Spacehog and chugging Pabst.”

There’s a lot of beer being forced down people’s throats at this party, but the victims don’t seem to be complaining about it. A lot of awkward kissing, too (after the beer, one would assume).

“Mother To A Brother” is released as a single, tomorrow. Goodbye Honolulu dropped their Heavy Gold debut last year.

-Scott Bryson

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Love Of Diagrams – “The Pyramid”

There’s probably some sort of artistic statement being made here, concerning the musician as a projection, but we’ll leave that to the academics.

This looks like the perfect apartment for projecting, by the way; there’s very little in it, aside from books and glasses of water. It’s pretty easy work, then, when a poltergeist sweeps though and puts everything in a pile.

“The Pyramid” comes from Love Of Diagrams’ 2007 album, Mosaic. They most recently released Blast, in 2015.

-Scott Bryson

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2016 Albums of the Year: Car Seat Headrest – Teens of Denial

car-seat-headrest-teens-of-denial-compressed

The Telescope presents: the top albums of 2016. We gathered best-of lists from staff and contributors, crunched some numbers and came up with a list of records that unanimously wowed us this year.

Welcome to the new era of music: a band self-releases eight albums, signs to a label, puts together a greatest-hits record and obtains overnight success. This is the story behind Will Toledo and the project he named after the place where he came up with his songs.

Car Seat Headrest wasted little time moving on from that best-of, Teens of Style. Seven months later, we had Teens of Denial, a critically-acclaimed follow-up that captures a youthful and all-too-familiar time of experimentation and discovery. And like all great albums that succeed in this, it did so without time stamping, focusing on the confusion and confidence and leaving specifics out of the equation.

Teens of Denial talks to the listener like every teenager who thinks they finally figured it all out. The tone helps you rewind to those naïve days, knowing now that it’s a beginning rather than an end. Toledo’s slacker vocals leave plenty of room to attach to the feelings he’s trying to capture, too. This album has a way of sounding like the sequel to your favorite album from your mid-teens.

The video for “Vincent” takes us back to that chapter in our youth where that guy is cutting too loose and ends up wrecking himself and the night for most of the folks involved. Two open chords played through a basic distortion: the uncomplicated arrangement really helps the song hit its mark. It’s tunes like this that make this record so easy to listen to over and over again.

-johnnysomebody

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